Jukai Ceremonies

Senshu offers incense during her Jukai ceremony
Senshu offers incense during her Jukai ceremony

Ashley Mannion-Woodward and Justin Ardnt received the sixteen precepts from Sokuzan during their Jukai ceremonies on January 11, 2015. It is a symbol of deeper commitment to the path- Sokuzan calls it “glue”.

Prior to the ceremony, the student hand stitches a Rakusu, with the guidance of Sewing Teachers Unyo and Seiko Sensei. The Rakusu resembles a bib, andrepresents the Buddha’s Robe. With each stitch, the student recites thethreerefuges: “I take refuge in the Buddha, I take refuge in the Dharma, I takerefuge in the Sangha.” Upon receiving Jukai, the student was given back their Rakusu, now with their Dharma/Bodhisattva names handwritten by Sokuzan on the white silk facing. 

Shoka recites the sixteen precepts during his Jukai ceremony
Shoka recites the sixteen precepts during his Jukai ceremony

Ashley was given the Dharma name, Senshu, meaning Hidden Treasure,Secret Pearl. Justin received the Dharma name, Shoka, meaning Bright Water, Crystal River. They also received a Ketchimyaku, handwritten by Sokuzan, which lists the bloodline of all ancestors back to the Buddha. Senshu and Shoka function as Practice Residents at SokukoJi Buddhist Temple/Monastery.

See the photo album on our Facebook page for more pictures.

Sesshin All-Day Sit and Kozan’s Ordination; Nov. 29 and 30

Please join us on Saturday for our last Saturday of the month all-day meditation and Dharma talks, private interviews with Sokuzan will be available. 9:00am – 9:00pm, $35 suggested donation; $6 for meal or dine at local restaurant.

Sunday morning service, followed by a Dharma talk by Sokuzan; 10:00am – 11:30am.

Kozan will be ordained on Sunday, 2:00pm – 4:00pm. A short reception will follow. All are welcome!

Chiezan Receives Full Ordination

Chiezan in his jubon
Chiezan in his jubon at the start of the ordination ceremony

Kyle Tomczyk moved into SokukoJi Buddhist Temple/Monastery in May of 2012.  A year later he received Jukai, or layprecepts from Sokuzan and was given the Dharma name Hoyuji Chiezan.  On Sunday, October 26th Chiezan received full ordination in the Soto Zen lineage of Japan.  He functions as the Ino (the head monk) at SokukoJi Temple/Monastery.

Unyo helps Chiezan with his robes
Unyo helps Chiezan with his robes
Kozan assists Sokuzan in performing the tonsure, or hair cutting which is a sign of devotion or humility
Kozan assists Sokuzan in performing the tonsure, or hair cutting which is a sign of devotion or humility
Sokuzan and Unyo help with the Okesa
Sokuzan and Unyo help with the Okesa
Chiezan hugs his mom after the ceremony
Chiezan hugs his mom after the ceremony

Dying and Death, A Closer Look

Join us in sangha as we contemplate and prepare for our own deaths. Sokuzan will give Dharma talks on dying, death and after death from Buddhist and other perspectives. Also, we will look together at some documents which define ahead of time how you would like to be cared for when you are no longer capable of making decisions for yourself. This will include advance directives, choosing a health care advocate, a living will and the “Five Wishes” document which is a commonly distributed advance directive template and does not necessarily support Buddhist practice without modifications.  We will also discuss caring for each other in sangha as we experience sickness, old age and death.  The cost is $20.00 for meals and materials.  Additional donations are greatly appreciated.  See announcement for more details. Contact Kozan to register.

Unyo Receives Full Ordination as a Soto Zen Monk

Unyo Recites the "Takkesage", or Robe Chant
Unyo Recites the “Takkesage”, or Robe Chant

On Saturday, May 31, 2014, Unyo (Priscilla) Brown received full ordination as a Soto Zen monk from Sokuzan who presided over the ceremony.  Through the offering of incense, the reciting of the sixteen Bodhisattva precepts, receiving her hand-sewn Okesa, and the cutting of hair as a symbol of her deeper commitment to this path, Unyo remarks at how “heavy”–and unavoidable–this step in her practice and training feels.

Hair Cutting
Hair Cutting

 

“The actual weight of the Okesa on my head during the Takkesage (robe chant) is a tactile reminder of the burden of suffering in the world.  I am extremely happy that I have lived long enough to come to this new beginning in my life and am deeply indebted to my Teacher, Sokuzan, for hisunconditional love, generosity, and willingness to share the Buddha’s teachings so freely to all who ask.  May I, too, serve others in that way.”

Kozan, Sokuzan and Unyo finishing the ordination ceremony
Kozan, Sokuzan and Unyo finishing the ordination ceremony